Discover The Loop

Listen, I want to tell you about the prettiest mile in Florida. 

Seriously, you can trust me on this, because I’m a trained observer. But don’t go blabbing it to everybody, because it’s still one of Florida’s best kept secrets.

It starts on High Bridge Road, just off U.S. A1A south of the Volusia County line and about half a dozen miles south of Flagler Beach. You can leave your car in the parking lot at North Peninsular State Park east of the bridge and hop on your bike. (Sure, you can drive The Loop, but why would you want to?). 

First you cross the low, aging drawbridge (a charming  infrastructural relic of the last century) where it spans the Halifax River. And suddenly you are on a two-lane road lined with tall, wind-bent palm trees and shady spreading oaks. 

To your left the road follows Bulow Creek, a primeval Florida marsh alive with all manner of water fowl, flitting things abuzz in the air and swamp critters of wondrous variety.  Soon the road begins to twist and turn, and you’d almost swear you’ve pedaled into a jungle. If not for the narrow strip of asphalt under your wheels, you might think you’d slipped back in time to an age when the only way to navigate this kind of terrain was afoot or apaddle. 

And here’s the really amazing thing about this short stretch of paradise: It’s just part and parcel of The Loop, a 24-mile elongated route that runs up one side of the Halifax and back down the other between HIghbridge and the Grenada Bridge, in Ormond Beach. 

I’ve cycled The Loop many times, as recently as just a couple of weeks ago, and it never fails to inspire. Plus, I keep discovering new things about it that I hadn’t noticed before. Its got miles of oak canopy – a veritable tree tunnel. Its bridges cross savannas and winding creeks that reveal epic views of water and sky.

And it’s not all about nature. Ride south from Highbridge to Ormond on John Anderson Dr. and you’ll get a serious case of house (waterfront mansion?) envy? Cross the Grenada heading west and duck into Bailey Riverbridge Gardens, under the bridge on the western side, and you can take a stroll on an impressive boardwalk that juts out into the Intercoastal. Or visit the delightful, morbidly named James Ormond Tomb Park, site of an old cotton and indigo plantation, and search out the ancient tree. Or maybe stop off at Tomoka State Park and look at the absurd wooden statue of the legendary chief who never was. And don’t forget the Dummett Sugar Mill Ruins, or follow the Woodham Trail. 

And if you’re an especially ambitious cyclists, you can extend your ride several miles by heading north on John Anderson to Flagler Beach (I recommend the roof deck of the Golden Lion for lunch) and then head south again on A1A past Gamble Rogers State Park. Among other things you’ll have about six miles of spectacular, uninterrupted Atlantic Ocean vistas to hold your attention on the way back to Highbridge. (if you’ve got a Ride With GPS account you can access this extended route by clicking on (https://ridewithgps.com/routes/27381323).

I keep telling people that there’s so much more to our little peninsula than just Disney and South Beach. Case in point: The Loop is a different Florida  entire.

(Feature photo by John Moran courtesy of Bike Florida.)STJR2C.069-2

Author: floridavelocipede

A sometime journalist who used to string words together for a living before I retired to run a non-profit cycle touring organization that will henceforth go unnamed, as I have subsequently retired from that career as well. I write a bi-monthly column, theater reviews and an occasional magazine piece for my old newspaper. If I still had a business card it would read: Ron Cunningham: Trained Observer Of The Human Condition. Because like The Donald, you know, ego.

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